redeem

[15] The -deem is not the same word as deem (which is related to doom). In fact, there never was a true -deem in it. It comes from Latin emere ‘take, buy’ (source also of English example, prompt, etc), which when combined with the prefix re- ‘again, back’ had a d grafted into it to produce redimere ‘buy back’. English probably acquired it via French rédimer. => EXAMPLE, PROMPT, SAMPLE
* * *
   The literal meaning is 'buy back,' from Latin redimere in this sense, formed from red-, a form of re- before vowels, 'again,' 'back,' and emere, 'to buy.'
   The figurative sense applies just as much as the literal: if you redeem yourself, you 'buy yourself back' from the action that had 'sold' you to a bad or evil influence.

The Hutchinson dictionary of word origins. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • redeem — re·deem /ri dēm/ vt 1 a: repurchase b: to repurchase by right and not on the open market redeem preferred shares 2 a: to free from a lien or pledge usu. by payment of the amount secured thereby …   Law dictionary

  • Redeem — Re*deem (r?*d?m ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Redeemed}. ( d?md ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Redeeming}.] [F. r[ e]dimer, L. redimere; pref. red , re re + emere, emptum, to buy, originally, to take, cf. OIr. em (in comp.), Lith. imti. Cf. {Assume}, {Consume},… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • redeem — re‧deem [rɪˈdiːm] verb [transitive] FINANCE 1. to pay off a loan or debt: • He intends to redeem the mortgage at the earliest opportunity. • When do you expect to redeem this …   Financial and business terms

  • redeem — [v1] recover possession buy back, buy off, call in, cash, cash in, change, cover, defray, discharge, exchange, get back, make good, pay off, purchase, ransom, recapture, reclaim, recoup, regain, reinstate, repay, replevin, replevy, repossess,… …   New thesaurus

  • Redeem — Allgemeine Informationen Genre(s) Alternative / Rock Gründung 2003 Website http://www.redeem.ch …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • redeem — ► VERB 1) make up for the faults or bad aspects of. 2) (redeem oneself) make up for one s poor past performance or behaviour. 3) save from sin, error, or evil. 4) fulfil (a pledge or promise). 5) gain or regain possession of in exchange for… …   English terms dictionary

  • redeem — [ri dēm′] vt. [LME redemen < MFr redimer < L redimere < re(d) , back + emere, to get, buy < IE base * em , to take > Lith imù, OSlav imǫ, to take] 1. to buy back 2. to get back; recover, as by paying a fee 3. to pay off (a mortgage …   English World dictionary

  • redeem — (v.) early 15c., from M.Fr. redemer (see REDEMPTION (Cf. redemption)). Related: Redeemed; redeeming …   Etymology dictionary

  • redeem — deliver, *rescue, ransom, save, reclaim Analogous words: *free, liberate, release, emancipate, manumit: restore, *renew, renovate: *recover, regain …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • redeem — [[t]rɪdi͟ːm[/t]] redeems, redeeming, redeemed 1) VERB If you redeem yourself or your reputation, you do something that makes people have a good opinion of you again after you have behaved or performed badly. [V n] He had realized the mistake he… …   English dictionary

  • redeem — re|deem [rıˈdi:m] v [T] formal ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(improve something)¦ 2 redeem yourself 3¦(get money for something)¦ 4¦(religion)¦ 5 redeem a promise/pledge 6¦(get something back)¦ ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ [Date: 1400 1500; : French; Origin: rédimer, from Latin redimere …   Dictionary of contemporary English

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